Report It

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Kentucky

All Kentuckians are mandated reporters. If you believe a child is being abused or neglected, call the Child Protection Hotline.

1-877-KYSAFE1 or 1-877-597-2331

For contact information in other states, please visit our Report It page.

Additional Support:

Child help: National Abuse Hotline:
1-800-4-CHILD
or 1-800-422-4453

 

For the Community

Everyone has a role in ensuring communities are safe places for children to grow and thrive.

In the efforts to end child abuse and neglect, knowledge is our best tool. The more you know, the more you can do to help those who have already been victimized and prevent it from happening again. Face It encourages you to learn more about child abuse and the programs in your community and to pass that information on to those around you.

Knowing the signs of child abuse and neglect is an essential tool for anyone working with children. Make note of the warning signs below.
  • Bruising in babies who are not cruising yet
  • For a child of any age, bruising to the ears, neck, torso, buttocks, or genitals
  • Burns on a young baby or child, such as those caused by cigarettes or immersion in hot water
  • Pain when toileting, frequent yeast infections or urinary tract infections, or any sexually transmitted disease or related symptoms could be signs of sexual abuse
  • Aggression toward peers, pets, other animals
  • Seems afraid of parents or other adults
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KENTUCKY’S SAFE INFANT ACT

Kentucky’s Safe Infant Act allows parents to leave babies younger than thirty (30) days old at a safe place. No one will call the police, and no one will ask for your name.

The law saves babies — and protects parents who can’t keep their babies.

The law says that a parent will not be criminally prosecuted for abandoning a baby (thirty (30) days old or younger), if the baby is taken to a safe place and has not been physically abused or neglected after birth.

What happens at a safe place?
A police officer, firefighter, emergency services provider or staff member at a participating place of worship will arrange to have your baby taken to the nearest hospital for an examination and any needed medical care. The hospital will also notify the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, the agency responsible for ensuring that the baby is adopted.

Learn more here.

Reporting Abuse or Neglect

In Kentucky, everyone is a mandated reporter. Anyone who has reasonable cause to believe that a child is being physically abused, sexually abused, or neglected should report child abuse and neglect to the Department for Community Based Services.

If you suspect abuse, call the Child Protection Hotline at
1-877-KYSAFE1 or 1-877-597-2331.

How You Can Help
  • Check out this short video for community members that will help to identify the signs of child abuse and neglect.
  • Simple acts of kindness can help reduce parental stress. This can include making a meal for a new parent, encouraging parents, offering to help a parent run errands by going along or caring for the child, and offering to set up a car pool with other parents. Even lending an ear to a parent or caregiver can help because talking about stress can help to reduce it.
Connect In Your Community
  • Share information about activities and events in your area to get youth and their families engaged in their community.
  • Volunteer with a Face It partner.
  • Attend or promote Face It’s free trainings for youth-serving organizations in Louisville. This includes organizations such as youth sports teams, faith-based organizations, community centers, youth development/enrichment centers, and those who serve vulnerable populations.
  • Interested in advocating for change in state laws or regulations? Check out the Face It policy agenda.

Be Aware of the Warning Signs

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Physical Abuse

Look for any bruising on a baby who is not yet pulling up and taking steps; bruising to the ears, neck, torso, buttocks, or genitals of any child under four years; unexplained injuries on children of any age.

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Sexual Abuse

Look for an increase in nightmares and/or other sleeping difficulties, withdrawn behavior, angry outbursts, anxiety, and not wanting to be alone with a particular individual(s).

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Fear of Telling

Children are afraid to tell about their abuse because they feel ashamed, don’t want the abuser to hurt them, don’t want to cause stress for their caregivers, or don’t want their abuser to go to jail.